0

Vocabulary: buying a house

buy-a-house-300x225Do you know what it means to be gazumped? If you read this post, you’ll soon find out!

As I am in the stressful process of trying to get on the property ladder (buy a house) in London, I thought I’d share with you some tips and interesting vocabulary. Bear in mind that I am a first-time buyer (never owned a house in my life) and I’m looking for a flat where to live (therefore I’m not interested in any buy to let).

This post might come in handy should you want to buy a property in the UK which, let’s get things straight, is likely to be a long and nerve-racking experience!

Apart from the fact that house prices have rocketed over the past couple of years, another annoying thing is that if you’re looking into buying a flat -as a house would be far too expensive!- most of the properties on the market are leaseholds (which means that after the lease expires, the flat goes back to the landlord). Finding a freehold (which means that you own the house) nowadays is a real stroke of luck! Adding to this, there is the chance that even when you think everything has gone smoothly and you’re about to complete the purchase, some other buyer jumps in and then you’re gazumped!

If you’re not a cash-buyer, you then need to apply for a mortgage (this is a type of loan you take out to buy a property) and choose the lender (bank) who offers you the best deal in terms of interest rates etc. You might want to rely on a broker to help you find the best products.

Obviously, while applying for a mortgage, you’ll need to start arranging viewings with real estate agents to go and see properties. It might be good to ask a couple of questions on the phone before setting on a trip to go and see a house. Here are the ones I suggest:

  • How much is left on the lease? (if it’s less than 80 years, I’d leave it)
  • Is the house in good condition? Does it need any major work?
  • Is it chain free? (if it’s not, typically you’ll need the vendor to find a house to buy before completing the purchase)

It might be good to think carefully about what kind of property you’d like to live in. Some people might not like the idea of living in a block and would rather live in a converted flat which usually belongs to a house (the typical Victorian houses that are so common in London) which used to be a two/three-storey house and was then split into two/three flats. A flat in a block would be called a purpose-built flat as it was originally built as a flat and not as a house. Some blocks might be former social housing* that the council has sold and are now managed by private companies. Some of the oldest council estates in London are quite beautiful brick buildings which reminds us of a past where social welfare still mattered.

Once you’ve found your dream house, you’ll need to make an offer to the vendor. Once they accept and the property is marked as sold, you’ll have to get in touch with a solicitor* who will help you with the conveyance and your lender who will send a surveyor who will make sure the house is really worth what you’re paying.

I hope you enjoyed this post and learnt a lot of useful terms!
Talk soon,
Deb 🙂

*Social housing is aimed at those in need who are struggling with their housing costs.

**What’s the difference between a solicitor and a lawyer? Lawyer is a general term for anyone who give legal advice and so a solicitor is a lawyer.

1

Medical English: English for pregnancy

babyonboardAs one of my students has recently found out she’s pregnant – and, consequently, came to me with a lot of vocabulary-related questions- I’ve decided to write a post about it!

I suppose this could fall into Medical English if you like!

I didn’t want to write a mere list of terms and definitions because I believe that, in order to learn new words, you should try to study them in context. In this way, it’s more likely that they’ll stick with you (=you’ll remember them).

First of all, to find out you’re pregnant you have to do a pregnancy test that can easily be bought at a local pharmacy. Next, you want to see your GP (General Practitioner) who is going to refer you to a hospital for your first antenatal appointment. At the appointment you’ll meet your midwife who will take care of you during your pregnancy, have a blood test and hand in your urine sample so that they can check you’re healthy and not lacking any vitamins, for instance.

The first trimester can be quite exhausting for some expectant mothers, a lot of them experience morning sickness and an ongoing metallic taste in their mouth which is quite annoying. If you live in London like I do, this is also a good time to request a ‘baby on board’ badge to wear when taking the tube (you just need to write an email to Transport for London and within a few days you get it delivered by mail!). Indeed you won’t have a bump yet but you want people to be more cautious, especially during rush hour.

During your 12th week, you should get your first scan which is quite exciting as you get to see the baby for the first time and hear their heartbeat! The ultrasound specialist will also be able to tell you your due date (= when you’ll give birth). At this point, you might want to tell your employer about your pregnancy and discuss when going on maternity leave.

Twenty weeks into your pregnancy (by then, apparently, you should have a little bump, make sure you use a cream to avoid stretch marks..), you’ll get your second scan and, should you want to, find out the sex*of your baby.

Depending how far in your pregnancy you are, you might want to go and check the delivery room where you’ll be admitted to once your water breaks and you go into labour . Should you not like it, you can self-refer yourself to another hospital.

To get ready for the delivery, mums and dads-to-be usually go to antenatal classes.

These are some of the questions you might want to ask a pregnant woman:

How far in your pregnancy are you?**

When are you due?

And this is how you answer (should you be the expectant mother):
I’m + number + weeks (pregnant) i.e. I’m 15 weeks pregnant
I’m due on + date / in + month

That’s it for now, I hope you’ve learned some new terms there!
Talk soon,
Deb

*what’s the difference between the words ‘gender’ and ‘sex’? This seems to be a question which often bugs people. To put it in a nutshell, when you talk about biology you should use the word ‘sex’ while when referring to the ‘social aspect’ you should use ‘gender’. So, for instance, if you do Gender Studies at university, you’ll learn about the role of men and women in different cultures, you’ll study politics, feminism etc.

** This is a useful structure to learn, look at this other example:
How far in the book are you? I’ve read 200 pages and I’m loving it!