Medical English: English for pregnancy

babyonboardAs one of my students has recently found out she’s pregnant – and, consequently, came to me with a lot of vocabulary-related questions- I’ve decided to write a post about it!

I suppose this could fall into Medical English if you like!

I didn’t want to write a mere list of terms and definitions because I believe that, in order to learn new words, you should try to study them in context. In this way, it’s more likely that they’ll stick with you (=you’ll remember them).

First of all, to find out you’re pregnant you have to do a pregnancy test that can easily be bought at a local pharmacy. Next, you want to see your GP (General Practitioner) who is going to refer you to a hospital for your first antenatal appointment. At the appointment you’ll meet your midwife who will take care of you during your pregnancy, have a blood test and hand in your urine sample so that they can check you’re healthy and not lacking any vitamins, for instance.

The first trimester can be quite exhausting for some expectant mothers, a lot of them experience morning sickness and an ongoing metallic taste in their mouth which is quite annoying. If you live in London like I do, this is also a good time to request a ‘baby on board’ badge to wear when taking the tube (you just need to write an email to Transport for London and within a few days you get it delivered by mail!). Indeed you won’t have a bump yet but you want people to be more cautious, especially during rush hour.

During your 12th week, you should get your first scan which is quite exciting as you get to see the baby for the first time and hear their heartbeat! The ultrasound specialist will also be able to tell you your due date (= when you’ll give birth). At this point, you might want to tell your employer about your pregnancy and discuss when going on maternity leave.

Twenty weeks into your pregnancy (by then, apparently, you should have a little bump, make sure you use a cream to avoid stretch marks..), you’ll get your second scan and, should you want to, find out the sex*of your baby.

Depending how far in your pregnancy you are, you might want to go and check the delivery room where you’ll be admitted to once your water breaks and you go into labour . Should you not like it, you can self-refer yourself to another hospital.

To get ready for the delivery, mums and dads-to-be usually go to antenatal classes.

These are some of the questions you might want to ask a pregnant woman:

How far in your pregnancy are you?**

When are you due?

And this is how you answer (should you be the expectant mother):
I’m + number + weeks (pregnant) i.e. I’m 15 weeks pregnant
I’m due on + date / in + month

That’s it for now, I hope you’ve learned some new terms there!
Talk soon,
Deb

*what’s the difference between the words ‘gender’ and ‘sex’? This seems to be a question which often bugs people. To put it in a nutshell, when you talk about biology you should use the word ‘sex’ while when referring to the ‘social aspect’ you should use ‘gender’. So, for instance, if you do Gender Studies at university, you’ll learn about the role of men and women in different cultures, you’ll study politics, feminism etc.

** This is a useful structure to learn, look at this other example:
How far in the book are you? I’ve read 200 pages and I’m loving it!

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One thought on “Medical English: English for pregnancy

  1. Pingback: English for parenting: newborns and baby stuff | Teach Taught Taught

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