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Idioms and expressions with the word ‘point’

images A few days ago someone asked me the meaning of the expression ‘at some point’ in the following sentence: ‘Come around at some point this week’. I suddenly realised that there are many idioms and expressions in English that use the word ‘point’. Here’s a selection of the ones I most often use:

TO BE POINTLESS / THERE BE NO POINT IN DOING SOMETHING / NOT TO SEE THE POINT IN DOING SOMETHING

If you say that ‘something is pointless’, you mean that it’s useless.
i.e. Talking to him is pointless, he never listens.

The expressions ‘there be no point IN doING something’ and ‘not to see the point in doing something’ have the same meaning.

i.e. There is no point in talking to him, he never listens.
i.e. I don’t see the point in talking to him, he never listens.

AT SOME POINT

‘at some point’ simply means ‘some time‘.
i.e. I’ll come around at some point this week
i.e. At what point in your life did you decide to become a teacher? (‘at what point’ in a question just means ‘when‘).

UP TO SOME/ A POINT

The expression ‘up to some/a point’ puts a limit to what is being said:
i.e. You can follow other people’s advice up to some point. >> (After this point) You should figure out by yourself what’s best for you.
i.e. That’s true up to a point

to some extent‘ has a similar meaning.
i.e. I agree with you to some extent

TO MAKE A POINT & HAVE A POINT & TO GET SOMEONE’S POINT & TO SEE SOMEONE’S POINT & MY POINT IS..

These idioms are used when discussing opinions.

To GIVE your opinion you could start by saying

‘My / The point is…
The point I want to make is ..
…that people should have the right to express their opinion

When discussing someone else’s opinion, you could say ‘I get your point’ / I see your point / I see the point you want to make / You have a point! / That’s a good point! ‘  to mean that you UNDERSTAND the other person’s view on something.

While, if you DON’T understand the other person’s opinion, you could say
“I’m sorry but…
     I don’t see your point
     I don’t see the point you want to make
     I don’t get your point

Note: all the above expressions are followed by the preposition ‘IN’ plus the gerund (-ING):
i.e. I don’t see your point in saying that people should mind their own business

TO MAKE A POINT OF DOING SOMETHING

If ‘you make a point of doing something’, you make sure you’re able to do it.
i.e. I always make a point of watching the news. I want to know what’s going on in the world.

TO GET TO THE POINT

When you ask someone ‘to get to the point’, you want to know what their intention / objective is.
i.e. I don’t have time to waste, can you please get to the point?

TO POINT something OUT TO someone

If you point something out, you want to draw people’s attention to it.
i.e. He pointed this problem out to me the other day.

I hope you saw the point in reading this post!
Talk soon,
Deb